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Tuesday, April 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Social change: the case of rural China. found in the catalog.

Social change: the case of rural China.

Sociological Resources for the Social Studies (Project)

Social change: the case of rural China.

  • 59 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by Allyn and Bacon in Boston .
Written in English

    Places:
  • China
    • Subjects:
    • China -- Rural conditions.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 83.

      SeriesEpisodes in social inquiry series
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHN677 .S63 1971
      The Physical Object
      Paginationv, 83 p.
      Number of Pages83
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5221678M
      LC Control Number75153559

      Rural China is home to about one in every ten people on earth and to more than million school-aged children—a staggering number, comparable to half the entire U.S. population. The children of rural China suffer the negative consequences of the country’s economic boom: their parents often move to the cities as migrant workers and [ ]. His publications include Empire and the Meaning of Religion in Manchuria, (Cambridge University Press ), Religion and the Making of Modern East Asia (Cambridge University Press ), and Sacred Village: Social Change and Religious Life in Rural North China (University of Hawai’i Press ). DuBois is chief editor of the Brill. This book presents a detailed case study of rural migrant workers experiences in a small town in a north China county. The author explores the processes and institutions that enable or preclude the social inclusion of rural workers into the town's socio-economic system. China contains one-fifth of the world's population and is the world's fastest-growing economy. A visitor to the country sees the meeting of an ancient culture that dates to .


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Social change: the case of rural China. by Sociological Resources for the Social Studies (Project) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Sociological Resources for the Social Studies (Project). Social change: the case of rural China. Boston, Allyn and Bacon [] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Sociological Resources for the Social Studies (Project) OCLC Number: Description: v, 83 pages illustrations 23 cm.

Series Title: Episodes in. Rural society in the People's Republic of China comprises less than a half of China's population (roughly 45%) and has a varied range of standard of living and means of living. Life in rural China differs from that of urban China.

In southern and coastal China, rural areas are developing and, in some areas, statistically approaching urban economies. In northwest and western regions. Social change can evolve from a number of different sources, including contact with other societies (diffusion), changes in the ecosystem (which can cause the loss of natural resources or widespread disease), technological change (epitomized by the Industrial Revolution, which created a new social group, the urban proletariat), and population growth and other.

Get this from a library. Elderly care, intergenerational relationships and social change in rural China. [Fang Cao] -- This book investigates how rapid socio-political-economic change in China since has affected intergenerational relationships and practices in rural areas, specifically the care provided to.

This has led to a gulf between public policy and people’s realities with food as experienced in homes and on the streets. Through grounded case studies in seven Latin American countries, this book explores how development and social change in food and agriculture are fundamentally experiential, contingent and unpredictable.

Rural Society. The meaning of rural. Social change in rural society. Contemporary rural-urban comparisons. BIBLIOGRAPHY. The scientific study of rural society as a specialized area of sociology is a development of the twentieth century and prior to World War II had its growth principally in the United such study has developed institutional support in.

Book Description. Gender and Rural Migration: Social change: the case of rural China. book, Conflict and Change explores the intersection of gender, migration, and rurality in 21st-century Western and non-Western contexts.

In a world where heightened globalization is making borders increasingly porous, rural communities form part of the migration nexus. This book presents a detailed case study of rural migrant workers experiences in a small town in a north China county.

The author explores the processes and institutions that enable or preclude the social inclusion of rural workers into the town’s socio-economic by: 3. UW Mailbox Seattle, WA Fax: () Email: [email protected] Publisher for the University of Washington Member of the Association of University Presses.

The Class System In Rural China: A Case Study Jonathan Unger For the first three decades after the establishment of the People’s Republic, class labels strongly influenced the life chances of each and every Chinese. A class label did not refer to a person’s current income nor to his or her relationship to the means of production.

It did not,File Size: KB. Book. Choosing Daughters: Family Change in Rural China. Stanford: Stanford University Press. Journal Articles. The New Rich and Their Unplanned Births: Stratified Reproduction under China’s Birth- Planning Policy.

Medical Anthropology Quarterly. Micro-Blogs, Online Forums, and the Birth-Control Policy: Social Media and the File Size: 50KB. In their book, Mars, Hornsby, and others trace China's breakneck urbanization and accompanying rural depopulation of recent decades.

Contributor Saskia Vendel projects that byChina will have added an urban population the size of Beijing each year for 35 years. Those interested in better understanding social change in a rapidly changing China will find the detailed empirical study and application of theory in this book a welcome addition to the field." - Gary Sigley, University of Western Australia "Hongguang He extends Foucault's ideas to the study of rural : Palgrave Macmillan UK.

This book provides a broad survey of Chinese rural households, examining ongoing changes in Chinese society and economy through the lens of the situation of rural families in : Wenrong Qian. Social Change 1 2. Social Change Introduction Introduction to Social Change Human migration between rural villages and big cities in China is Social Movements and Change Change can also occur from people joining together for a common cause.

This is called a social movement. Social movements are classified according to the kind of. Rural Communities: Legacy + Change Currently unavailable. Communities in rural America are a complex mixture of peoples and cultures, ranging from miners who have been laid off in West Virginia, to Laotian immigrants relocating in Kansas to work at a beef processing plant, to entrepreneurs drawing up plans for a world-class ski resort in Cited by: "Bitter and Sweet is a rich and detailed ethnography that makes a convincing case for following food through its transformations as it is created, intimate ethnography with a wide body of food studies and anthropological theory to illustrate how everyday people in rural China are finding ways to ‘domesticate’ social and cultural change Brand: Ellen Oxfeld.

Reviews "Bitter and Sweet is a rich and detailed ethnography that makes a convincing case for following food through its transformations as it is created, exchanged and consumed to reveal myriad themes of contemporary social life, what I would call a “gustemological” approach to culture."—Society for the Anthropology of Food and.

Elderly care, intergenerational relationships and social change in rural China / Fang Cao. Format Book Published [Singapore]: Palgrave Macmillan, [] © Description xix, pages: illustrations, maps ; 22 cm Notes Includes bibliographical references and index.

Contents. Rural Women in Urban China: Gender, Migration, and Social Change by Jacka, Tamara, Armonk, N.Y., M. Sharpe,xii + pp. Since the adoption of reforms and the introduction of the open‐door policy at the end of the s, the society of Mainland China has undergone great changes during a period that has been characterized by transition to a Author: Fumie Ohashi.

Basically, social change comes from two sources. One source is random or unique factors such as climate, weather, or the presence of specific groups of people. Another source is systematic factors, such as government, available resources, and the social organization of society.

On the whole, social change is usually a combination of systematic. Stanford University Press has published Assistant Professor of Anthropology Lihong Shi’s book Choosing Daughters: Family Change in Rural China. The book explores an emerging reproductive pattern in rural China in which a noticeable proportion of young couples have willingly accepted having a single daughter.

Shi delves into the social, economic and. Bradley M. Gardner in his recent book, China’s Great Migration: How the Poor Built a Prosperous Nation, makes a persuasive case that the single most important factor in China’s dramatic rise from poverty to prosperity was the simple fact that Beijing got out of the way — that Bejing was forced to get out of the way — and allowed people.

A: Poverty in China largely refers to the rural populations who are concentrated in remote and mountainous areas. By the end ofAuthor: Microinsurance Centre at Milliman. This positive effect of ICT utilization on social network is especially prominent in rural areas of developing countries for three reasons: first, the development and utilization of ICT in rural regions are backward; second, rural people's social network is more narrow than their urban counterparts, since social network in rural regions is Cited by: 3.

Bebbington, in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Rural development can be understood as the unfolding of capitalism in rural areas, and as that package of policy and project interventions that aim to foster socio-economic change and human improvement in rural areas.

Some writing on ‘rural development’ thus addresses general. *Rachel Murphy () 'Sex Ratio Imbalances and China's Care for Girls Programme: A Case Study of a Social Problem,' The China Quarterly, (Sept): Minhui Zhou, Rachel Murphy and Ran Tao () 'Effects of Parents' Migration on the Education of Children Left Behind in Rural China', Population and Development Review, 40 (2),   Originating from Wuhan, China, the novel Corona Virus has affected most of the countries across the continents.

Due to its world-wide spread WHO declared it as “pandemic” on March Since. Entrepreneurship is increasingly considered to be integral to development; however, social and cultural norms impact on the extent to which women in developing countries engage with, and accrue the benefits of, entrepreneurial activity.

Using data collected from 49 members of a rural social enterprise in North India, we examine the relationships between Cited by: China's patrilineal and patriarchal tradition has encouraged a long-standing preference for male heirs within families.

Coupled with China's birth-planning policy, this has led to a severe gender imbalance. But a counterpattern is emerging in rural China where a noticeable proportion of young couples have willingly accepted having a single daughter. The authors of this very welcome edited volume believe that "the past two decades in China have witnessed the fastest change ever and anywhere of a rural economy and society" (p.

Few scholars interested in economic development and social change would argue with this assessment, and there are many lessons to be learned from rural China's Author: Gregory Veeck. cially in rural areas. And a big population can increase a country's economic as well as political and military power; in a world of economic and political uncertainty, countries such as India and China can seem to benefit from the sheer size of their domestic markets.

But these benefits derive from a moderate increase in population. The opening chapter outlines the background of the research, its importance in the context of China and other countries, the rationale for choosing the case study communities in rural China, and the composition of the research team.

Chapter 2 explores key issues in the role of social entrepreneurship and leadership in rural community development. This book aims to do two things: first, it provides detailed empirical analysis of the welfare and living conditions of the rural elderly since the early s in the context of large-scale rural-to-urban migration, and second, it explores the evolution of the rural pension system in China over the past two decades and raises a number of issues.

We generated a list of the 40 most popular Yale School of Management case studies in by combining data from our publishers, Google analytics, and other measures of interest and adoption.

In compiling the list, we gave additional weight to usage outside Yale. Contents List of Maps, Tables, and Figures Preface 1. Introduction Distinct Features of the Process of Change Social Change 2. Zhen Settlements between Urban and Rural Introduction Preconditions for the Designation of Zhen The Development of the Number of Zhen Definition and Development of the Urban Population in Zhen Perspectives in the Process of Urbanization and.

This book draws upon selected, revised and edited papers from a conference of rural geographers from the UK, USA and Canada, held at the Universities of Plymouth and Exeter. It focuses on rural regions, which are facing conflicting demands, pressures and challenges, which themselves have far-reaching implications for rural space and society.

China Information presents timely and in-depth analyses of major developments in contemporary China and overseas Chinese communities in the areas of politics, economics, law, ecology, culture, and society, including literature and the arts.

It is refereed academic journal with an international readership indexed in SSCI and Scopus. This book draws on empirical evidence from sociology, psychology, and organizational studies to argue that people's everyday use of gender as a primary cultural tool for organizing social.

This book focuses on China's rural industries, offering a theoretical framework to explain institutional change. Susan Whiting explores the complex interactions of individuals, institutions and the broader political economy to examine variation and change in property rights and extractive institutions in China's rural industrial by:.

Crime, Law and Social Change publishes peer reviewed, original research articles addressing crime and the political economy of crime, whether at the global, national, regional or local levels, anywhere in the world.

The Journal often presents work on financial crime, corruption, organized criminal groups, criminal enterprises and illegal.The aim of the chapter is to analyse the social media site Facebook as a communication tool in rural community development.

Using a case study approach, the analysis is primarily focused on the Facebook page of one rural community in the midlands of Ireland and the complex interplay between those who use the page and those who do not engage with the : Pádraig Wims.Choosing Daughters is an interesting and innovative book that examines the transformations of patrilineal and patriarchal traditions in rural China through the lens of reproductive preferences and child-bearing decisions.

Drawing on rich ethnographic data collected in the village of Lijia in northeastern China, Lihong Shi documents how rural young couples voluntarily choose to .