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Tuesday, April 21, 2020 | History

5 edition of Weapons & Warfare in Anglo-Saxon England (Monograph (University of Oxford. Committee for Archaeology), No. 21.) found in the catalog.

Weapons & Warfare in Anglo-Saxon England (Monograph (University of Oxford. Committee for Archaeology), No. 21.)

Sonia Chadwick Hawkes

Weapons & Warfare in Anglo-Saxon England (Monograph (University of Oxford. Committee for Archaeology), No. 21.)

  • 162 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Oxford Univ School of Archaeology .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • History: World,
  • History,
  • England,
  • Military art and science,
  • Medieval, 500-1500,
  • History, Military,
  • Archaeology, Medieval,
  • Congresses,
  • 449-1066,
  • Excavations (Archaeology),
  • Great Britain

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages224
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8473439M
    ISBN 100947816216
    ISBN 109780947816216


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Weapons & Warfare in Anglo-Saxon England (Monograph (University of Oxford. Committee for Archaeology), No. 21.) by Sonia Chadwick Hawkes Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book is a fairly comprehensive overview of both the gear and the nature of warfare in Anglo Saxon England, and has everything going for it: beautiful full colour plates of artefacts, reproductions, and reenactors, well researched and informative sections on all types of gear, specific details on certain artefacts, and much by: Weapons and warfare in Anglo-Saxon England Volume 21 of Committee for Archaeology: Oxford University Committee for Archaeology monograph, University Oxford Issue 21 of Monograph (University of Oxford.

Committee for Archaeology), No. 21 Monograph / Reviews: 1. Waterloo was largely won by Prussians, Hanoverians, Saxons, Dutch and Belgians. Although the British prefer not to dwell on it, these nations supplied around three-quarters of thesoldiers who defeated Napoleon at Waterloo. Of the 26 infantry brigades in Wellington’s army of 70, only nine were British; of the 12 cavalry brigades.

Warfare in Anglo-Saxon England c - A.D. Note: Much of this article has also appeared in my Article on The Anglo-Saxon Fyrd, which can be found on the Regia Anglorum website. The Old English word fyrd is used by many modern writers to describe the Anglo-Saxon army, and indeed this is one of its meanings, although the word here is equally valid.

In its oldest form the word fyrd had meant. This is a fine book, well-illustrated and well-written. It has the benefit of the author's experience using some of the weapons mentioned in reenactment fights.

He has actually used some of these weapons himself. On the other hand it lacks the scholarly experience of Hilda Ellis Davidson (The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England [])/5(5). Weapons and Warfare in Anglo-Saxon England by Sonia Chadwick Hawkes,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(2).

Anglo-Saxon weaponry War was a way of life to the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes who invaded and settled in Britain. They were fleeing the encroaching Romans, and the Germanic tribes in turn encroached on the remnants of the Empire in Britain.

Weapons and warfare in Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Oxford University Committee for Archaeology: Distributed by Oxbow Books, (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Sonia Chadwick Hawkes.

Richard Underwood’s book Anglo Saxon Weapons and Warfare is recommended for those wishing further detail on this subject. In The Amber Treasure, I have tried to use all these weapons and as accurately as possible recreate the tactics of how they were used. The military capabilities of late Anglo-Saxon England appear to have been impressive.

The defeat of the Vikings and the conquest of the Danelaw in the ninth and tenth centuries were remarkable administrative and military feats. Later, in the s, both King Sweyn of Denmark and the emperor, Henry III, were keen to obtain English military. Paul Hill, formerly curator of Kingston Upon Thames Museum in Surrey, is well known as a lecturer, author and expert on Anglo-Saxon and Norman history and military archaeology, and he has written several books on these subjects, among them The Age of Athelstan: Britain's Forgotten History, The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great and The Anglo-Saxons at War /5(9).

The period of Anglo-Saxon warfare spans the 5th Century AD to the 11th in technology and tactics resemble those of other European cultural areas of the Early Middle Ages, although the Anglo-Saxons, unlike the Continental Germanic tribes such as the Franks and the Goths, do not appear to have regularly fought on horseback.

[1]. Weapons and warfare in Anglo-Saxon England. [Sonia Chadwick-Hawkes;] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library. Create lists, bibliographies and reviews: or Search WorldCat.

Find items in libraries near you. 'Weapons and Armour' - The arms and armour of the early medieval period. 'Anglo-Saxon Military Organisation' - How the fyrd was organised. 'Viking Military Organisation' - How the Viking here was organised.

'Welsh Warfare' - How warfare was conducted in. Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published.

Weapons and warfare in Anglo-Saxon England by Sonia Chadwick Hawkes,Oxford University Committee for Archaeology, Distributed by Oxbow Books edition, in EnglishPages: Spears were the most common weapons found in England, and were probably the most commonly used weapons in Early Medieval Western Europe more widely.

Examples have been found in around 85% of Early Anglo-Saxon graves containing weapons - around 40% of adult male graves from this period. It is known that across many Northern European societies – and probably including Anglo-Saxon England.

Weaponry in Anglo-Saxon England explained. Many different weapons were created and used in Anglo-Saxon England between the fifth and eleventh centuries. Spears, used for piercing and throwing, were the most common commonplace weapons included the sword, axe, and knife—bows and arrows, as well as slings, were not frequently used by the Anglo-Saxons.

Historians call this period the Anglo-Saxon period of England. During the Anglo-Saxon period the society revolved around warfare and various types of weapons that supported the warring nature of the people of that era.

Some of the weapons that were the most important in this time period were the spear, sword, battle axe, and shield. A survey describing the weapons and equipment of the Anglo-Saxon warrior during the three-and-a-half centuries from the end of Roman Britain to the arrival of the Vikings (AD ).

From inside the bookReviews: 1. The most common Anglo-Saxon weapon was a spear, the most feared weapon was a battle-ax, and the most precious was a sword. It took hours for a blacksmith to craft an iron sword into shape. For close combat, Anglo-Saxon warriors used a type of knife, called a scramasax.

History › Anglo-Saxons › Anglo-Saxon weapons ›. Is part of Book Title Weapons and warfare in Anglo-Saxon England Author(s) Sonia Chadwick Hawkes Date Publisher Oxford University Committee for Archaeology Pub place Oxford Volume Monographs/Oxford University Committee for Archaeology ISBN This book is about the practice of war in Anglo-Saxon times.

The thirteen contributions range from the study of weapons, their typology, metallurgy and reconstruction, through the use of the weapons and the wounds they inflict, to attitudes to warfare and its effects on society; evidence from placenames and coinage, and about warhorses is also. Weapons and Warfare in Anglo-Saxon England.

Exeter: Oxford University Committee for Archaeology, And it is from there that I retrieved the images found on the website. Page 31 is an example of the all-to-important spearhead.

Page 32 has images of sword grips (hilts) and scabard mounts and chapes. Ten Minute English and British History #03 -The Early Anglo-Saxons and the Mercian Supremacy - Duration: History Mattersviews.

Anglo-Saxon warfare Last updated Decem The period of Anglo-Saxon warfare spans the 5th Century AD to the 11th in technology and tactics resemble those of other European cultural areas of the Early Middle Ages, although the Anglo-Saxons, unlike the Continental Germanic tribes such as the Franks and the Goths, do not appear to have regularly fought on horseback.

The period of Anglo Saxon warfare spans the 5th Century C.E. to the 11th in England. Its technology and tactics resemble those of other European cultural areas of the Early Middle are extant contemporary descriptions of some Anglo. - migration/vendel era sword hilts from the book "The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England" by H.E.

Davidson Stay safe and healthy. Please practice hand-washing and social distancing, and check out our resources for adapting to these times. Buy Weapons and Warfare in Anglo-Saxon England (Monograph (University of Oxford. Committee for Archaeology), No. ) 1st by Hawkes, Sonia Chadwick (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(2). Underwood seemed in part to be summarizing information from Sonia Chadwick Hawkes's Weapons and Warfare in Anglo-Saxon England, now thoroughly out of print.

I am writing from a Welsh viewpoint, but due to differing burial customs there's much better information for the Anglo-Saxons. Anglo-Saxon England was early medieval England, existing from the 5th to the 11th centuries from the end of Roman Britain until the Norman conquest in It consisted of various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until when it was united as the Kingdom of England by King Æthelstan (r.

It became part of the short-lived North Sea Empire of Cnut the Great, a personal union between England. The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England is a major reference-work covering the history, archaeology, arts, architecture, literatures and languages of England from the Roman withdrawal to the Norman Conquest (c - AD).Maintains and stimulates 5/5(1).

In the two centuries before the Norman invasion of England, Anglo-Saxon and Viking forces clashed repeatedly in bloody battles across the country. Repeated Viking victories in the 9th century led to their settlement in the north of the country, but the tide of war ebbed and flowed until the final Anglo-Saxon victory before the Norman Conquest.

Using stunning artwork, this book examines in. Introducing Martha Stewart for Mixbook» Log In. Photo Books. This book is intended to give a general view of Anglo- Saxon culture as seen through the eyes of the archaeologist.

No book of this length can hope to do more than sketch the broad outlines of the subject; consequently I have had to be selective in my approach and I am only too conscious of the many gaps that occur in this story of six hundred years of the most formative period of English history.

The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England. Hilda Roderick Ellis Davidson — History. Its Archaeology and Literature offering a comprehensive guide to Anglo-Saxon warfare. History of Everyday Life in Medieval Scotland. Edward J Cowan — Few accounts of ancient warfare have looked at how the weapons were made and how they were.

Anglo-Saxon society was built around the concept of feud, and it is clear from history, law, and literature that the twin concerns of family and vengeance remained pillars of Anglo-Saxon society and consciousness throughout the period.

Given constant warfare and the cultural and social importance of feuding, it would appear logical thatAuthor: Elnathan Barnett. EconometricsbyExamplexx. The Best of the Argonauts: The Redefinition of the Epic Hero in Book One of Apollonius' Argonautica (Hellenistic Culture and Society) The billiard encyclopedia: An illustrated history of the sport TAG: Best Anglo-Saxon Weapons.

The most common Anglo-Saxon weapon was a spear, the most feared weapon was a battle-axe, and the most precious was a sword. It took hours for a blacksmith to craft an iron sword into shape.

For close combat, Anglo-Saxon warriors used a type of knife, called a scramasax. History › Anglo-Saxons › Anglo-Saxon weapons ›. Anglo-Saxon Weapons and Armour. This was a 'heroic' age: the surviving stories and poems make this clear.

The greatest virtue was loyalty to one's lord: the warrior shared the spoils of battle, but he was also willing to die for his lord - indeed it was considered a disgrace to. Before I get too far into this series on the Battles of Anglo-Saxon England here on The Traveller’s Path, I thought I should give you all a bit of an understanding of how, exactly, the Anglo-Saxons conducted their wars, and what weapons they would have course, like with all things Anglo-Saxon, there is not a lot of information about all this, and so historians differ on how exactly.

The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England from the 5th to 7th century Paul Mortimer and Matt Bunker The contributors to this book bring their practical and academic knowledge to an exploration of new ideas and information about the making and use of swords in the early Anglo-Saxon period.This book is an invaluable exploration of the significance of the sword as symbol and weapon in the in Books > History > Military > Weapons & Warfare > Conventional The Sword in Anglo Saxon England by Hilda Ellis Davidson is the best book of its kind for the sheer.The Anglo-Saxon gods lend their names to days of the week: Tuesday from Tiw, the dark god; Wednesday from Woden, the war god; Thursday from Thor, the thunder god; Friday from Frigga, goddess of the home.

Most Anglo-Saxon poetry emerges from an .